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Economic/Commercial Section

Property Office

The Property Office of the U.S. Embassy in Managua monitors ongoing U.S. citizen property claims against the Government of Nicaragua, particularly cases where properties were confiscated during the 1980s. Property office staff are prohibited from advancing claims or acting as legal attorneys or representatives for U.S. citizens.

There are many difficulties in defending property rights in Nicaragua. Property registries suffer from years of poor manual recordkeeping.  Many jurisdictions still do not have electronic record keeping, and others have only recently adopted a digital registry system.  Establishing a title history is often difficult. The wrongful expropriation of 28,000 properties in the 1980s has greatly complicated the process. Attracted by escalating property values and a slow developing judicial system, some individuals have engaged in various forms of land trafficking and outright theft. Judges and municipal authorities have been known to collude with such individuals, and a cottage industry supplies false titles and other documents to those who scheme to steal land. Property invasions usually go unchallenged by local law enforcement officials and in some cases turn violent. New and constantly changing government requirements for titling and registering properties have made the process cumbersome and unpredictable.

Potential real estate investors should be aware of the delicate issues surrounding real estate transactions. Previous to any real estate transaction we recommend a thorough due diligence and the advice of local legal representation to avoid future property disputes. For more information, please see our Due Diligence Advisory.

The Property Office can be contacted at (011) (505) 2252-7234, or e-mail: managuapropoffice@state.gov.

Government of Nicaragua Liaison Office for U.S. Claims

In December 2008, the Nicaraguan Attorney General's Office created a liaison office for U.S. citizen property claimants awaiting the resolution of their cases as a result of property confiscations that occurred from 1979-1990.  The purpose of this office is to provide U.S. citizen claimants and the U.S. Embassy Property Office a point of contact in the Nicaraguan Government to discuss the status of U.S. property claims.  The coordinator of the liaison office is Ms. Rebeca Zuniga. Ms. Zuniga is a Nicaraguan attorney and notary public.

Further information on the liaison office as well as Nicaraguan laws and procedures regarding property claims can be found at the Nicaraguan Attorney General's Office website at http://www.pgr.gob.ni.

Due Dilligence Advisory

  • Buying Property in Nicaragua
    Potential real estate investors should be aware of the delicate issues
    surrounding real estate transactions. Previous to any real estate
    transaction we recommend a thorough due diligence and the advice of local legal representation to avoid future property disputes. For more information, please see our Due Diligence Advisory.