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Dual Nationality
 

The concept of dual nationality means that a person is a citizen of two countries at the same time. Each country has its own citizenship laws based on its own policy. Persons may have dual nationality by automatic operation of different laws rather than by choice. For example, a child born in a foreign country to U.S. citizen parents may be both a U.S. citizen and a citizen of the country of birth.  For more information about the legal ramifications of dual nationality, please click here.


Nicaraguan-American Dual National Minors
U.S. Citizen minors who also have Nicaraguan citizenship must comply with departure requirements specific to Nicaraguan children under the age of 18.  This is an unofficial guide and any questions regarding departure requirements should be directed to Nicaraguan Immigration.  Contact Information for the main offices of Nicaraguan Immigration is as follows:
Telephone      (505) 2-244-3989
Address:        De los semáforos de la Tenderí 3 ½ Cuadras al Norte
Managua, Nicaragua.

Please read below to see if any of the specific situations apply to your child.

• Situation One: The child entered Nicaragua using a Nicaraguan passport and will stay less than 30 days

The child will need to present the same passport when leaving.  If the stay is shorter than 30 days, then the child does not need an exit visa. 

• Situation Two: The child entered Nicaragua using a Nicaraguan passport and will stay 30 days or more

A.  If both parents are in Nicaragua but only one parent is traveling with the child, the following documentation will need to be presented to the authorities at the airport or a border crossing in order for the child to leave the country:

  • Parent’s identification (passport or cédula) and a copy of the ID
  • Child’s birth certificate and a copy
  • Notarized travel authorization in original

B. If only one parent is in Nicaragua, the in-country parent will need to submit the following to Nicaraguan Immigration in order to obtain an exit visa for the child:

 

  • Child’s valid passport and birth certificate, and a copy of each
  • In-country parent’s identification (passport or cédula), original and copy
  • Notarized travel authorization signed by the in-country parent
  • Nicaraguan migratory entry/exit records for the non-present parent
  • Application (form available at the Nicaraguan Immigration office)

C. If neither parent is in Nicaragua, the following documents must be submitted to Nicaraguan Immigration in order to obtain an exit visa for the child:  

  • Child’s valid passport and birth certificate, and a copy of each
  • Notarized copy of parents’ identification (passport or cédula)
  • Notarized travel authorization signed by both parents
  • Application (form available at the Nicaraguan Immigration office)

Situation Three: The child entered Nicaragua using his/her U.S. passport and has overstayed the time authorized by Nicaraguan Immigration

Nicaraguan Immigration authorities typically issue a 90-day courtesy visa.  If the child remains longer than the authorized stay, an extension should be requested at the main Nicaraguan Immigration office.  Overstaying a visa will impede the child’s departure until the corresponding fine is paid.

• Situation Four: The child was issued a new passport at the U.S. Embassy

If the child was born in Nicaragua and is traveling for the first time using his/her U.S. passport issued by the U.S. Embassy in Managua, the child’s parents (to include adoptive parents) need to obtain a validation stamp for the child at the main Nicaraguan Immigration office so the child may depart the country.  Nicaraguan Immigration may require that the parents process a Nicaraguan passport or “Salvaconducto” for their child.   For more information, contact Nicaraguan Immigration directly.

**Important Note**

Per Nicaraguan law, documents produced/notarized in the United States or any other country must be authenticated at the Nicaraguan Embassy or Consulate in such country and at the Ministry of Foreign Relations in Managua before submitting them at Nicaraguan Immigration.  The Nicaraguan government may also require that the document be authenticated by the U.S. authority with jurisdiction over the document.